From The Hon Michael Keenan MP, Minister for Justice:

Today, I launched the Australian Institute of Criminology’s (AIC) new website, Crime Statistics Australia, a comprehensive online resource aimed at streamlining crime data.

This is an Australian first, providing a one-stop-shop for current and trend data on Australian crime and justice datasets including, victims of crime, offenders, corrections, courts, and recent statistical findings from the AIC’s Monitoring Program series.

This means that instead of waiting for reports to be published, data can be updated in real time as it becomes available.

Importantly, it is an easy to use, accessible website, for government and law enforcement agencies to guide policies that protect Australians and make our streets safer.

The website will continually evolve to include a broader range of datasets including Drug Use Monitoring in Australia, the National Deaths in Custody Program, and the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission’s National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program.

Data from Homicide in Australia and Australian Crime: Facts and Figures are the first statistical series to be released on the new website.

This coincides with today’s release of the AIC’s Homicide in Australia 2012–13 to 2013–14: National Homicide Monitoring Program (NHMP) Report, which describes the nature and context of homicides that occurred between 2012–13 and 2013–14, and the trends in homicide victimisation and offending since 1989-90.

The report revealed that Australia’s homicide rate has continued to decrease over the past 25 years and is currently at an all-time historic low of one victim per 100,000 of population.

The number of homicide victims and offenders has decreased by 25 per cent and 19 per cent respectively over the same period.

The report also identified that:

• Males remain over-represented as both victims (64 per cent) and offenders (88 per cent).
• Women remain overrepresented as victims of intimate partner homicide (IPH) with 99 victims (79%) between 2012 and 2014.
• Illicit drug use preceded a third (161) of homicide incidents. This is an increase of 12 per cent from the 2010–12 reporting period.
• Knives continue to be the most commonly used murder weapon, with 37 percent of all homicide incidents in 2013–14 involving knives or sharp instruments.
• The use of firearms in homicide incidents has continued to decline. In 1989–90, 25 per cent of homicides involved the use of a firearm, while in 2013–14 firearms were used in 13 per cent.
Homicide is an abhorrent crime that is completely unacceptable in our society.
The Coalition Government is committed to protecting all Australians from violence. That’s why we have invested:
• $200 million in the Second Action Plan to Reduce Violence against Women and their Children and the Government’s Women’s Safety Package.
• $30 million in a national campaign to reduce violence against women and their children, jointly funded with the states and territories.
• $90 million for our Safer Streets Programme and Safer Communities Fund to install CCTV and lighting at crime hotspots to address crime and anti-social behaviour in public areas.
• $300 million to boost funding for treatment, after care, education, prevention and support to get Australians off illicit drugs – on top of the up to $310 million already allocated for treatment services.
• $116 million in the National Anti-Gangs Squad with strike teams and liaison officers across the country.
• $25.4 million to expand the AFP’s National Forensics Rapid Lab to enhance the AFP’s capacity to detect and seize illegal firearms. We also implemented and strengthened the National Firearms Agreement and will hold the first national firearms amnesty since the Port Arthur massacre in July this year.
Data from the Drug Use Monitoring in Australia (DUMA) program, National Deaths in Custody Program (NDICP), and the Australian Criminal Intelligence Commission’s National Wastewater Drug Monitoring Program, will be made available on Crime Statistics Australia in late 2017.

Crime Statistics Australia is available at http://crimestats.aic.gov.au/